Chassis

3 point reel seat belt conversion

ziptie test, safety 3rd!

Hole cut for threaded belt insert

Test fit of new piece

Use the lathe to clean up these spacers

Reel mount

Reel mout welded in

Upper mount welded in and test with spacer

Reel mounted

Otherside done too

Works quite nicely, could do with a guide for the belt on the seat

And finally plugged into place!

Chassis

Rear rust clear up

Doing some clean up work, the Sportster has been on the road for a while now so it was time to check for rust and clear anything up

Little bit inside the shock tower area, most was on the metal upright towards the back of the car.

More from inside the shock tower

This part is covered by the tub down to where the E30 A arms mount.

Under and below the tub area in the rear

The good news is that it was all surface, no structural issue. The worst part was the end of square bar under the back runs along the tank.

Cleaned everything up with a wire brush on the angle grinder, treated with loctite rust remedy and painted with chassis and rollbar paint. Also to go on later some underseal with waxoil.

Chassis

Rear brake pads

I fitted ATE brake pads to the front some time ago, they bite much better than the Jurid ones and generally feel better. 

The rear was still on Jurid and as they’ll probably never wear out I thought I’d swap them over to ATE so they match all around.

Used the opportunity to check and retorque the H&R spacers at the rear.

Need to repaint this calliper at some point, the silver never was a good choice, the front is already black.

Now labelled ATE Classic, 1988 donor!

Solid disks on from the donor E30 325i, the front is vented.

All back together again

 

Otherside done too, these Ryobi lights are really handy – even when working on the driveway.

 

 

Chassis

Varex exhaust build part 4

As I was busy Richard sorted the wiring out for the control box:

Wiring, inside the tub running along the tank with the rest of the rear loom

Wiring running along transmission tunnel, protected by a piece of fuel tubing to stop stray debris from damaging it.

Behind the fuse box, hooked in via 7.5amp fuse to an ignition feed

Located the control box in the same area just off the centre console.

Everything back in place under the dash

Just needs the rear putting back together again.

Chassis

Varex exhaust build part 3

Built the other side of the exhaust today. Welding is ‘better’ than when I started but still pretty uneven. I can’t weld too far consistently around the curve yet. Did punch a few holes in the metal in places which results in having to ‘glob’ in filler rod to build it back up again. This part was back gassed as on the others before as it was a butt joint.

The 45º and straight pieces are sleeve fit, have welded these too so less clamps are needed. It also cuts down on potential exhaust leaks.

Once the two back boxes were hung I used some boxes and various peices of wood to hold the tips in place at the right height, this is with the car on the ground. Nothing on the Sportster is straight so this was done visually.

I used a piece of angle metal to line the tops and ends of the tips up. This helped make sure the tips were aligned  straight with the ground, with each other and spaced from the back of the car.

Welding the tips on was a bit tricky, blew a few holes in the metal especially where the gaps were bigger. The left box alignment is slighly off, but it’s not visible once mounted and the tips are in the right place visually.

Both exhaust pipes mounted, the v-bands are visible in this shot. I used a tiny bit of exhaust paste on the mating surface, shouldn’t be needed with v-bands but I’d rather not have to take them off again! Also visible the zip tie exhaust hanger, nothing like attaching your exhaust to your suspension ;o)  Kinds tempted to make some straight pipes that can be put in place of the back boxes, but that’s a whole new level of noise (did try running it with just the header and you need to wear ear protection…)

The more permanent hanger, this is a part is from pypes a US manfuacturer of exahust pipes. Had that left over from building an exhaust for the Mustang (http://www.mustang67.co.uk/exhaust-upgrade/) last year. Available at https://www.summitracing.com/

View from the otherside, wiring is hanging down. These cables need plumbing in properly and the metal shields putting back on the mufflers.

Car down on the ground from a low angle, the exahust tips are closer together than before (due to the input on the backbox being offset rather than in the middle).

The tips stick out a little further than the old ones, the wall thickness and slash cut work quite nicely.

Temporarily wired up the control box, and now for the noise test:

Closed it’s quieter than the jetex micro bullet muffers + the magnaflow boxes. Open it’s a bit of a beast, louder than before so that should be fun 😉 It’s pretty much were I wanted it to be, will see what it’s like on the road once the wiring is done.

Chassis

Varex exhaust build part 2

Step 14: Cut down the output pipes, otherwise the tips would stick out too far.

Step 15: Tip test fit, could move these back further by cutting the tip input down a little which would make the hole bigger.

Step 16: Test fit on car, it’s just push fit to at this point

Opened up the cover that’s over the mechanisum which actuates the volume flap

View from the top, position seems quite good here

View of the inside of the back box, the perforated metal is the bypass output

The other side, the hole show is the bypass, the perforated tube up to the flap works much like the straight though magnaflow back boxes I took off when it is open.

Chassis

Varex exhaust build part 1

Progress on building the new exhaust. The welds a’it purdy but they’re solid and not tea bag considering I’ve never used a TIG before and have learned how to use it with YouTube tutorials…

Step 1: Remove the old exhaust:

Step 2: Test fit some pipes, ordered the wrong bend, so either need to modify or get another one

Step 3: CAD (Card board aided design) to get the angles for the 2″ to 2.5″ transition. The height difference is 80mm, the input and output are parallel.

Step 4: Transition parts tacked together with v-bands clamps at one end. The v-band connects the backbox to the rest of the pipes, will allow for some angle adjustment later if needed.

Step 5: Back gas feed, v band clamp in place to reduce chance of warping when welding that part.

Step 6: The two height / size transitions welded up (don’t look too closely). Back gas worked well, clean weld through no sugaring / oxidisation on the backs.

Step 7: Cut down the inputs on the back boxes, they input at a slight angle so needed cutting flush for the v-band to be welded on.

Step 8: V-bands welded on – these were both back gassed

Step 9: Cut out hangers for from stainless tock and cut holes in each.

Step 10: Hangers bent 90º – welded these on, bit of a tough one to get the amps right, melted away a bit much of the original metal but I think I made it longer than it needs to be to compensate.

Step 11: Finishing up welding the first piece – this goes from the exsiting output all the way to the back box

Step 12: Pipe in place, it will be clamped were the colour changes from stainless, to stainless covered in dirt

Step 13: Back box in place on the hanger (into the existing E36 style exhaust hanger).

Step 14: May need to move the head shield a bit as the back boxes are closer to the centre of the car due to the offset inlet.

The bullet mufflers are now no longer part of the exhaust system, in theory the closed setting should be quieter than before and open should be the same or louder!