Bodywork

3D Printed light bracket finalised and dust cover for LED centre lights

Part evolution from initial concept to final co-polyester print, shown at the front the traditional bulb clear lens, LED amber indicator and LED ring light.

The final part:

Test fit with traditional bulb holder style clear lens indicator:

New LED centres, these don’t have the big tail and rubber seal out the back so it’s vulnerable to stone impacts and dirt inside the rear arches.

To solve the first/damage issue I’ve modelled up a dust cap, on the right version 1 printed in one part. The rough surface comes from removing supports. Version 2 on the left, printed in two parts, up the other way. That leaves a clean finish on the ourside from the print bed and clean surface without any overhang for the inside.

Version 2 split print in more detail, these parts are glued together using CA / Superglue

Wire clearance

Wire cap in place

The end is shaped so that shrink tube can easily be place over the cables to protect them

Bodywork

3D Printed light brackets Version 2 test

Version 2 on the left, much smaller than the inital version:

Some clearance to fit two next to each other on the Sporster

The part is still more than strong enough for to keep the light in

Test fitting on the wing

LED centre light test fit (yep, rusty screws need changing)

View from the outside

Bodywork

Hella Mix and Match 3D Print Light Brackets

When we first build the Sportster 3D printing wasn’t a thing for home users. This has changed in the last 13 years, so it seem like a good time to make some improvments.

Version one of the rear light brackets where aluminim, work fine don’t look so good:

CAD Designs so far, allows for 3mm body thinkness when mounted. It’ll need a gasket to keep the damp out, also the fibre glass is not a consisten thinkness:

 

Some rendered versions with clear models of the outter ring and inner light:

Now we need to print the first protoype and see how it fits:

 

Chassis

Rear brake pads

I fitted ATE brake pads to the front some time ago, they bite much better than the Jurid ones and generally feel better. 

The rear was still on Jurid and as they’ll probably never wear out I thought I’d swap them over to ATE so they match all around.

Used the opportunity to check and retorque the H&R spacers at the rear.

Need to repaint this calliper at some point, the silver never was a good choice, the front is already black.

Now labelled ATE Classic, 1988 donor!

Solid disks on from the donor E30 325i, the front is vented.

All back together again

 

Otherside done too, these Ryobi lights are really handy – even when working on the driveway.

 

 

Chassis

Varex exhaust build part 4

As I was busy Richard sorted the wiring out for the control box:

Wiring, inside the tub running along the tank with the rest of the rear loom

Wiring running along transmission tunnel, protected by a piece of fuel tubing to stop stray debris from damaging it.

Behind the fuse box, hooked in via 7.5amp fuse to an ignition feed

Located the control box in the same area just off the centre console.

Everything back in place under the dash

Just needs the rear putting back together again.

Chassis

Varex exhaust build part 3

Built the other side of the exhaust today. Welding is ‘better’ than when I started but still pretty uneven. I can’t weld too far consistently around the curve yet. Did punch a few holes in the metal in places which results in having to ‘glob’ in filler rod to build it back up again. This part was back gassed as on the others before as it was a butt joint.

The 45º and straight pieces are sleeve fit, have welded these too so less clamps are needed. It also cuts down on potential exhaust leaks.

Once the two back boxes were hung I used some boxes and various peices of wood to hold the tips in place at the right height, this is with the car on the ground. Nothing on the Sportster is straight so this was done visually.

I used a piece of angle metal to line the tops and ends of the tips up. This helped make sure the tips were aligned  straight with the ground, with each other and spaced from the back of the car.

Welding the tips on was a bit tricky, blew a few holes in the metal especially where the gaps were bigger. The left box alignment is slighly off, but it’s not visible once mounted and the tips are in the right place visually.

Both exhaust pipes mounted, the v-bands are visible in this shot. I used a tiny bit of exhaust paste on the mating surface, shouldn’t be needed with v-bands but I’d rather not have to take them off again! Also visible the zip tie exhaust hanger, nothing like attaching your exhaust to your suspension ;o)  Kinds tempted to make some straight pipes that can be put in place of the back boxes, but that’s a whole new level of noise (did try running it with just the header and you need to wear ear protection…)

The more permanent hanger, this is a part is from pypes a US manfuacturer of exahust pipes. Had that left over from building an exhaust for the Mustang (http://www.mustang67.co.uk/exhaust-upgrade/) last year. Available at https://www.summitracing.com/

View from the otherside, wiring is hanging down. These cables need plumbing in properly and the metal shields putting back on the mufflers.

Car down on the ground from a low angle, the exahust tips are closer together than before (due to the input on the backbox being offset rather than in the middle).

The tips stick out a little further than the old ones, the wall thickness and slash cut work quite nicely.

Temporarily wired up the control box, and now for the noise test:

Closed it’s quieter than the jetex micro bullet muffers + the magnaflow boxes. Open it’s a bit of a beast, louder than before so that should be fun 😉 It’s pretty much were I wanted it to be, will see what it’s like on the road once the wiring is done.